Ruckus Equity Action Plan



In accord with our mission that reads, “We seek to lift up voices, perspectives, and histories that are often overlooked in Kentucky and its surrounding region,” the staff and board of Ruckus acknowledge that consistently scrutinizing our internal structure—as well as our published content—is essential to combating institutional racism, queerphobia, and the many effects of income inequality. As such, we want to be as transparent as possible about our current deficiencies relating to these forces, and our strategies for correcting them. Currently, our staff and board are completely white. This speaks to our own shortsightedness as an organization and does not reflect the communities we initially set out to serve. The landscape of professional art spaces in Kentucky currently and historically excludes Black, Indigenous, and People of Color, and Ruckus will no longer remain compliant with that reality. Through our own internal changes and the published writings of our authors, we hope to see Ruckus become a leader in equity-driven action for Kentucky’s art spaces.

As a nonprofit and publication, we are committed to changing ourselves now and hope to one day be a leader in reforming the art communities we help cover and archive. We intend to make these changes through the following, ongoing strategies:

  1. By the end of 2020, move to install new board members so that there is at least 50%+ Black, Indigenous, and People of Color (BIPOC) representation.
  2. Sustain 50%+ BIPOC representation on our board at all times going forward.
  3. The implementation of the Taylor+McAtee Welcoming Microgrant for new Black writers, which provides a recurring set of honorariums, annually.
  4. The investment and implementation of new and other minority microgrants in future years.
  5. The development of an annual budget for personnel (editorial staff), with the first official hire––and the first editor position to be formally compensated––being restricted only to a BIPOC applicant.
  6. The solicitation of content that actively redistributes power within the Kentucky arts community (see our “article content we are always looking for”).
  7. Continued commitment to a multicultural and geographically diverse field of written subject matter from a writer pool of diverse backgrounds.